Places to submit

Literary Juice

Sara Rajan founded Literary Juice as an outlet for authors to share their most honest works without having to conform to conventional narrative guidelines. LJ encourages writers to break all ties with convention and free their inner weird-sad-happy-freaky-romantic selves!   “We accept all genres of prose, poetry, and, more recently, art. Lately, we’ve done away with all artistic boundaries. There are no rules here. We have no direction. Sometimes we don’t even know where we’re going. We go up. Down. Sideways. All over the place. Welcome to the Mad Hatter’s literary circle.” Submit!  

Prompts

Strongly affected. . . Prompt #347

Today’s writing prompt is a visualization . . . then the prompt. Set yourself up for an uninterrupted twenty minutes. Get comfortable. Have your writing implements nearby . . . paper and pen or computer. Settle into your chair. Feet flat on floor. Hands relaxed. Rotate shoulders in a circle. Reverse direction. Stretch arms out in front. Arms overhead. Arms to the side. Take a deep breath in. Hold. Let go. Feel your feet connected to the floor. And that connection goes down into the earth, way down, deep down, to the center of the earth. Firmly planted, deeply rooted. Feel the connection up your legs, through your calves, into your knees. Feeling connected up into your thighs. Completely relax into your chair, letting go of all tension that might be in your legs and thighs. Just let go. Deep breath in. Deep breath out. Let your hands go limp….

Places to submit

Flyway Magazine

Flyway: Journal of Writing & Environment is an online journal publishing poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and visual art that explores the many complicated facets of the word environment – whether rural, urban, or suburban; whether built or wild – and all its social and political implications. Submission Period: October 1 to May 1.  Visual art: year-round. In addition to publishing issues on a rolling schedule, Flyway sponsors a yearly Sweet Corn Prize in Poetry and Fiction and a Notes from the Field Nonfiction Award. “We are interested in work that explores the intersection of human experience and the environment, broadly interpreted: work that focuses on ecology, science and the environmental imagination, certainly, but also work that focuses on place, on natural and built environments, and on the ways that people interact with their environments. We are looking for work that surprises, moves, haunts, or affects the reader in some significant way.” Authors…

Guest Bloggers

Revision: When the really big ideas show up.

Today’s Guest Blogger Rachael Herron has this to say about revision. I’m back in the middle of revision of a book, and I’m finally swimming in the water I love. What I adore about revision is this: I know the world. I invented it, after all! When I open the document, I’m right in the middle of something I understand. It’s much easier, for me, to drop in for hours and rest on the page. It’s also easier to come out of, to shake off. First drafts remain torture for me. So many of you love the first drafts, and I can admit that sometimes, the writing of new words is glorious. You surprise yourself with a turn of phrase that you’re pretty sure is genius and has probably never been said before. The plot bends and a tree you wrote about comes to life and points a branched finger…

Places to submit

Epoch Magazine

EPOCH is an open forum for literary fiction, poetry, essays, screenplays, cartoons, graphic art, and graphic fiction. Reading Period: September 15 to April 15 Guidelines: Submissions by mail only, addressed to the appropriate editor: e.g. Fiction Editor, Poetry Editor, Essay Editor. Screenplays, cartoons, graphic art, and graphic fiction should be so labeled on the envelope. Good Luck

Just Write

Write Memoir in Voice of Narrator

Whether you tell your story chronologically, or with flashbacks, or with intercutting, it’s important to write your memoir in the voice of the narrator. Examples of these different ways of telling a story are used in The Write Spot Anthology: Discoveries. “Maintaining a solid narrative structure is critical to ensure readers move in step with the sequence of life events. . . When they [readers] can follow your progression as a character, they can also fully enter your story.” —Dorit Sasson, “Refresher Course,” The Writer, February 2016 Note from Marlene: When writing about something that happened in childhood, use appropriate age-based language. Show character growth by using adult language when writing about the character as an adult. Examples of narrative structure, character growth and details on how to use intercutting in your writing can be found in The Write Spot Anthology: Discoveries.